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Janken

SUBMITTED BYPatrick Bickford / Jason Grant / Nicholas Hallsworth

SUGGESTED TOPIC: General Game

E-GO EDITED BY: Mooloo

BORROWED FROM / INSPIRED BY: HERE

DATE ADDED: Jun 19, 2007  

TRANSLATED BYSatoru Miyakoshi

 

 

J-GO EDITED BY: HERE

 

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5-15 min.

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BRIEF OUTLINE: Janken is Japanese name for the Rock, Scissors, Paper game; also known as Roshambo. Students walk around playing Janken and the winner says a target vocabulary word.

 

DETAILED EXPLANATION:

  1. Students begin with the chant, "Rock, Scissors, Paper, 1, 2, 3." On the three students throw either rock, scissors or paper. Scissors beats paper; paper beats rock; rock beats scissors.
  2. If both players throw the same object, they play a tie-round, this time just chanting, "1, 2, 3." They carry on till a winner is found. The winner says a target vocab word. Then, the loser says a target word, but it cannot be the same word.

 

VARIATIONS:

  • 3+ Person Janken: This version of Janken can be confusing to understand because it is usually played extremely fast. However, the concept is simple. With three or more players, you keep playing Janken until only two objects are played. For example, in a 4-person Janken, if two people play a 'rock,' one person throws 'paper' and the last person throws 'scissors,' they all must play again. However, if two people play 'rock' and the other two play 'scissors,' the rock-players win.
  • Large Group Janken: This variation of Janken is played by one person, the organizer, play Janken against the crowd. This variation is most commonly used when there are many people playing (6+) and you want to cut the number of people down quickly. Anyone who beats the organizer keeps playing; the 'losers' and 'tiers' both lose. The winners keep playing against the organizer until the group is cut down to a managable size to play amongst themselves. Amazingly, Japanese are quite honest when this game is played in large groups, even if they are perfect strangers.
  • King of Janken / Janken Trainsubmitted by Jason Grant:
    • This works just like normal janken with just one twist. After the students play Janken the loser has to stand behind the winner with his/her hands on the winner's shoulders. This is repeated many times with the line getting longer each time. When two lines meet each other the front most students play Janken and whole losing line has to go to the very end of the whole winning line. In the end the whole class will be one line with the student that is "the King of Janken" in the front of the line.
    • I usually use this for introduction activities. When they meet each other they have the following conversation:
      • A: "Hello, my name is A."
      • B: "Hello, my name is B."
      • A: "Nice to meet you."
      • B: "Nice to meet you, too."
    • After they they janken and make lines.
    • When using this for a game, be sure to tell the students that everyone has to speak English, not just the person that is at the head of the line.
  • Class Knockout submitted by Nicholas Hallsworth:
    • You can play this game with various topics, but I'll use animals for example. Introduce 6 animals: snake, rabbit, bear, monkey, tiger and giraffe. Then practice pronunciation.
    • Play Janken with the whole class. The students who lose sit down and the ones who win or tie stay standing up.
    • For Round 1, everyone chants together, "Rock, scissors, paper, snake snake snake," or simply "snake snake snake." On the last 'snake' the students throw. The winners remain standing for Round 2 (rabbit). See the Large Group Janken variation above if you don't know how to play Janken in big groups.
    • The students that make it all the way to Round 6 (giraffe) and beat the round are the winners.
    • This variation is good with all grades, small to large class sizes, and the recommended playing time is 5-10 minutes.
    • This is a simple game you can slip in to the lesson to practice a set of vocabulary before the main game. For example, you could follow up this game with the Gokiburi game (a.k.a. Shinka).

Janken can be used for practically any topic. If the target vocabulary is actions, the winner tells the loser to do an action. If the target is numbers, the winner can say a number and the loser must count up to that number. If the target is food, the winner can say a color and the loser has to choose type of food that has the same color. If the target is animals, teach the students the sounds along with the animals. Have the winner say an animal and the loser must say the sound. Think about it and get creative!

 

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS:

  • Janken is arguably the most popular in Japan, besides baseball and sumo. This is the first game children learn in Japan so you should never have to explain this game.
  • The Janken chant is, "Saisho gu janken pon," which basically translates as, "When Janken is played, it starts with rock." The short version to this chant is, "Janken pon." (HINT: if you want to psych out your students, say "Saisho kara," which translates as, "Let's play, NOW!" You'll win everytime!)

 

 

 

  •  
     
  • 概要: じゃんけんはよく知られている、「紙、石、はさみ」のゲームです。また、Roshamboとして知られています。生徒はじゃんけんをしながら歩き回ります。勝った人はターゲットボキャブラリーを言います。

     

    必要な教材

    • 上の「Materials Needed」に見てください。

     

    手順

    1. 生徒は紙、石または、はさみを出す。はさみは、紙に勝つ。紙は、石に勝つ。石は、はさみに勝つ。
    2. 両方のプレーヤーが同じ物を出したら、引き分けで、もう一度「あいこでしょ。」と言う。英語では"Let's play again."と言う。
    3. 勝者はターゲットボキャブラリーを言う。敗者はターゲットワードを答える。(例えば Q:“Animal?”A:“Cat”など)。

     

    バリエーション

      • 3人のじゃんけんは、たいていとても速く行われるので、理解するのが難しいのですが、コンセプトは単純です。
      • 3人以上の場合には紙、石、はさみのうち、2種類になるまでじゃんけんを続けます。たとえば4人のじゃんけんでは2人が「石」を出して、一人が「紙」、あとの一人が「はさみ」を出せば、全員もう一度じゃんけんをします。しかし、2人が「石」、あとの2人が「はさみ」を出せば、「石」を出した人が勝ちです。
      • 大集団でのじゃんけんバージョンでは、一人の人が代表になり、他の大勢の人とじゃんけんします。このバージョンはたくさんの人が参加しているグループで、じゃんけんによって人数をすばやく減らしたいときによく使われます。代表者に勝ち続けた人だけがじゃんけんを続けられます。負けやあいこの人は両方、「負け」になります。
      • グループが、自分達でじゃんけんできる程度の人数に減るまで、勝者は代表者と対戦し続けます。驚くべきことに、たとえお互いに知らない人であっても、このゲームが大勢のグループで行われるとき、日本人はすんなり参加します。
      • King of Janken:
        • 生徒はパートナーを探す。
        • 探したら、普通のじゃんけんをする。
        • 負けた生徒は勝った生徒の後ろに行って、手を肩にのせる。
        • また、1に戻って、別のパートナーを探す。
        • 列同士がじゃんけんする場合、列の先頭の人同士はじゃんけんして、負けた列は勝った列の後ろにつく。
        • 最終的では、全クラスは一列(ヘビ)になって、一番「じぇんかんが強い」人はその先頭。
        • いろんなゲームに使えるじゃんけんのアレンジ版。普段は自己紹介のゲームと一緒に使う。生徒が自己紹介した後、じゃんけんをすると楽しい。注意点は自己紹介する時は列のみんながしっかり英語を言うけど、先頭の人しかじゃんけんができない。
      • Class Janken Knockout submitted by Nicholas Hallsworth:
        • You can play this game with various topics, but I'll use animals for example. Introduce 6 animals: snake, rabbit, bear, monkey, tiger and giraffe. Then practice pronunciation.
        • Play Janken with the whole class. The students who lose sit down and the ones who win or tie stay standing up.
        • For Round 1, everyone chants together, "Rock, scissors, paper, snake snake snake." On the last 'snake' the students throw. The winners remain standing for Round 2 (rabbit). See the Large Group Janken variation above if you don't know how to play Janken in big groups.
        • The students that make it all the way to Round 6 (giraffe) and beat the round are the winners.
        • This variation is good with all grades, small to large class sizes, and the recommended playing time is 5-10 minutes.
        • This is a simple game you can slip in to the lesson to practice a set of vocabulary before the main game. For example, you could follow up this game with the Gokiburi game (a.k.a. Shinka).
      • じゃんけんはあらゆるトピックに使うことができます。また、じゃんけんの結果を目的に応じて活用することができます。ターゲットボキャブラリーがアクションであるならば、勝者はそのアクションをするように敗者に言います。ターゲットが数であるならば、勝者は数を言い、敗者にその数まで数えさせることができます。ターゲットが食べ物であるならば、勝者は色を言い、敗者はその色をもつ食べ物を選んで言わなければなりません。ターゲットが動物であるならば、動物の泣き声などを生徒に教えて、勝者に動物の名前、敗者に泣き声を言わせます。他にもいろいろありますので、創造的に発展させます。

     

    教える際のアドバイス

    • 野球と相撲以上に、じゃんけんはおそらく日本で最もよく知られています。これは、子供たちが日本で学ぶ最初のゲームなので、うまくいけばこのゲームを説明する必要はありません。
    • じゃんけんの言い方は、こうです。「最初はグー、じゃんけんぽん。」それは基本的に次のように訳せます。"When Janken is played, it starts with rock."
    • ショートバージョンは「じゃんけんポン」です。
    • ヒント:「さあ、始めましょう」と言いましょう。英語では"Let's play, NOW!"と言います。

     

      

     


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