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Pokemon Karuta 1-100

SUBMITTED BY Elizabeth Reiman

SUGGESTED TOPIC: Numbers

E-GO EDITED BY: まだ 

BORROWED FROM / INSPIRED BY: Karuta game

DATE ADDED: Jul 27, 2012 

TRANSLATED BY: まだ

 

 

J-GO EDITED BY: まだ

 

 Grade 1āGrade 2ăGrade 3ąGrade 4ćGrade 5ĉGrade 6ċ

  Small Classes (1-15 Students)ÒLarge Classes (16-39 Students)ÓHuge Classes (40+ Students)ÔBad/Misbehaved ClassesÕHandicapped ClassesÖ

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10 - 35 min.

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BRIEF OUTLINE
 Students are divided into teams and are given cards with numbers on them. They talk to people on other teams and try to collect the most cards

 
 

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

  •  5 individual decks with numbers 1-30 and 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100.

 

DETAILED EXPLANATION:

  1.  Students are divided into teams of 3-5 (smaller teams work the best; potentially, if you have a small enough class, pairs are possible).

  2. The team is given a pack of "Pokemon Karuta" cards, with each deck being a different color and having numbers going from 1-30 (or whatever you're teaching). The color of the deck determines the team color 

  3.  Deal out the cards so that all the cards are divided equally. The students cannot look at the cards; they hold them in their hand pokeball side up.

  4.  People who are on different teams (different colored cards) talk to each other. When they approach someone from another team, they greet each other (hello), and then flip over the top card and say the number on the card (This is important; they're supposed to practicing learning numbers, and oftentimes they get so into the game that they forget this part).

  5. The person with the biggest number is the winner, and they get to keep their opponent's card. They put the card that they got in their pocket (they don't use the card that they received) and put the card that they just used at the bottom of their pile (This is also important; students tend to "forget" to put the card at the bottom of the pile when that card is a high number card, so keep an eye out for that).

  6.  If the two cards are the same, janken; the winner takes the card.

  7.  When a student runs out of cards (of the cards they originally started with), they sit down. Eventually, everyone will sit down with one person remaining.

  8.  Then, get back into the original groups and count the cards that you have. The team with the most cards is the winner.

 

VARIATIONS:

  • I use the cards as karuta cards as well (it gets the kids more interested when they can look at Pokemon pictures)

 

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS:

  • This works the best with younger elementary school grades (1-3 absolutely love it, 4th grade students don't seem to have a preference, and I haven't tried it with 5-6)

    Comments: My students always get really excited when they see that I brought the karuta cards, they love this game so much. One student dubbed it "Pokemon Janken;" I had been calling it "Pokemon Collecting Game" because I couldn't think of a good name. This same student actually asked me to make him his own set so that he could play it with his friends outside of school.

 

概要: HERE

 

必要な教材

  • 上の「Materials Needed」に見てください。

手順

  1. HERE

バリエーション

  • HERE

教える際のアドバイス

  • HERE

注意すること

  • HERE

  

 


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This page was last modified on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 01:33:00 PM