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Go: JHS Grammar PageNOMINATIVE CASE

Japanese name

 

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DEFINITION:


EXAMPLE:


NOTES:

Pronouns are a big part of first-year English, yet often underexplained. Generally your JTE might explain it like this: “First person is I, second person is you, and everything else is third person.” This is pretty simple and fairly useful. However it is good to give a full range of nouns, and not just pronouns, to show students the difference between first, second, and third person. Why? Because in English verbs are conjugated (the word changes in spelling and pronunciation) depending on the person number of the subject.


Person

Pronoun or common noun

Attendant form of the verb “to be”

1人称

I

am

2人称

you

is

3人称

he, she, it, Mary, pencil, Rover, love

are

 

Often it is said about the third person, “the third person is anything you can point to.” Teachers often say this because many students do not know what a noun is. It is an easy way to get students to correctly pick out most common nouns from verbs and adjectives. I added “love” there despite the fact that most students may not understand that concepts and ideas are also nouns. Your teacher may not wish you to use concept examples in class when talking about the third person.


The distinction between the three is generally easy, however there may be some confusion about what verb form to use when switching between persons in a conversation. For example, a student asks, “Are you Taro?” where you and Taro are the same being the question is directed at. When talking about Taro, the student may fail to realize that “you” is second while “Taro” is third despite being the same object being pointed out; “Taro are happy.” This is a tendency to identify with the object instead of the identifying word itself.





 


This page was last modified on Monday, February 11, 2013 11:42:08 AM