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Go: JHS GrammarMatch the Whose

 

SUBMITTED BY: Joyce P. Le

BORROWED FROM / INSPIRED BY: Old Games

EDITED BY: Tatyana Safronova

GRAMMAR: Possessive

EXAMPLE: Whose pen is this? It is Joyce's pen.

DATE ADDED: Jan 12, 2008

 

    Small Classes (1-15 Students)ÒLarge Classes (16-39 Students)Ó

  SpeakingèListeningéListeningë

15-30 min.

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BRIEF OUTLINE: Students match the items to the people by practicing listening and speaking.  

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

  • MatchTheWhose worksheets: There are three pages on the worksheet.

 

DETAILED EXPLANATION:

  1. Let’s Listen: JTE and ALT will rotate asking and answering questions for the listening exercise. Students will listen and connect the items with the correct people. Then teachers will check the answers by asking the questions and randomly choosing students (or asking for volunteers) to answer the questions.
  2. Let’s Write: Tell students to write the questions next to each item for which they need to find the answer. It is easier to explain this by drawing an example on the board. Draw 3 random items (apple, flower and tree) and 2 people. Connect one of the items (flower) to the person with a line. Number the remaining two items (apple and tree) which are not connected. Write the questions next to each item. You should write “Whose apple is this?” and “Whose tree is this?” Give students a few minutes to write their questions on the worksheets.
  3. Let’s Speak: Tell students with worksheet A to find students with worksheet B for the interview part. Students will play Janken and only the winner will get to ask a question. Students must play Janken for every question. 

 

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS:

  • Make your own answers for the listening part or use the dialogue below. For higher level class, teachers can consider teaching students how to change the question for plural nouns. For example, instead of “Whose book is this?” it should be “Whose books are these?”
  • ALT: Whose book is this? JTE: It’s Bill’s.
  • ALT: Whose tea (tea pot) is this? JTE: It’s Bart Simpson’s.
  • ALT: Whose ice cream is this? JTE: It’s Koji and Lisa’s.
  • ALT: Whose pencil is this? JTE: It’s the JHS students’.
  • JTE: Whose snowboard is this? ALT: It’s Mike’s.
  • JTE: Whose clock is this? ALT: It’s Koji and Lisa’s.
  • JTE: Whose Doraemon is this? ALT: It’s Bart Simpson’s.
  • JTE: Whose can is this? ALT: It’s Mike’s.

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This page was last modified on Wednesday, March 28, 2012 01:35:32 PM