Skip to main content

Home  ES  JHS  HS  Articles  Blogs  Forum  Links  NonTextbook  Volunteers  Warmups  Shoutbox  SUBMISSIONS   

Pen Glasses

 

SUBMITTED BY: Ben Roche

BORROWED FROM / INSPIRED BY: My kid days

EDITED BY: まだ

GRAMMAR: Demonstrative Pronoun

EXAMPLE: This is your pen.

DATE ADDED: June 24, 2010

 

    ÒÓÔÕ

  èé

15-20 min.

2 Votes: 4 Stars

If you're going to give this activity

a low-rating, please post a useful

comment to help make it better.

SearchJHSActivity

BRIEF OUTLINE:  Students decorate their own crazy paper "glasses", which they can't actually see through, then try to identify which of the pens in the group is their pen.

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

  • PenGlasses attachment: Before class, color and cut-out one pair of glasses for yourself. You may need a slightly larger size for yourself. Also, prepare enough glasses for each student in the class (printed on B4 size paper). You don't have to cut out all the glasses yourself, just cut each print into thirds and let the students cut out their own glasses

 

DETAILED EXPLANATION:

  1. Start by modeling the activity with your students. (5 minutes). Get a few students to come to the front and each bring a pen. Put all the pens, including one of your own on the desk in front of you. Now, put on your glasses, which you shouldn't be able to see through, and try to identify your pen using the target: "Is this my pen?" The students should answer "Yes, it is./No, it isn't." Pick up the wrong pen a few times before picking up the correct one. Once you've found your pen, take off the glasses, put your pen back with the other pens in the group, and have one of the students try it. Once the class has got the gist of how to do the activity, ask your helpers to take their pens and sit down.
  2. Give each student their own set of glasses to decorate. Set a time limit of five minutes and make sure they cut out the glasses before coloring them.
  3. After five minutes of decorating, quickly do the model again but this time ask for 4-6 volunteers to come and help you. There will most likely be many volunteers because students will want to show off their new sporty glasses.
  4. Finally, break the class into groups and start the activity. Let groups do the activity for about 5-10 minutes.

 

VARIATIONS:

  • The above activity can be immediately followed up with a similar activity using "that". Each pair of glasses has four small diamonds. Have students cut out the diamonds. Then, one student puts on their glasses (which they can now see out of a little). The other students in the group show the student random things they have at their desks, and the student with the glasses tries to identify the objects using "Is that a _____?" Encourage students to use anything they have, and to move the object around as the student tries to identify it, for example, moving the object extremely close to the student's face, spinning the object, etc. This extra activity could take about another 10-15 minutes. Be sure to model what you want them to do before beginning.

 

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS:

  • When I made my glasses, I gave them big, strange, blood-shot eyes. Using some kind of big eyes on your glasses will really get everyone's attention when you put them on.
  • When modeling for the class, everytime you mis-identify a pen, turn to the class, raise your arms, and give an overdramatic shout of frustation. The students will laugh and see that this is a fun activity to do.

 

TIPS/CAUTIONS:

  • Make sure students don't cut out the "eyes" on their glasses. The whole point of wearing the glasses is so that they can't see.
  • When you give out the glasses to the students, make sure they know the time limit. Shout to the class when there are 4 minutes, 3 minutes, 2, and 1 minute left. If you don't, they can easily take 20 minutes to cut and decorate the glasses.
  • Make sure they cut out the glasses before decorating them. The cutting alone takes most kids 3-4 minutes. If they start decorating first, you'll never wrap up the decorating and cutting in five minutes.
  • Also, you might think about printing out the glasses on thicker paper.

If you have an updated attachment, email it to the site: admin (at) epedia (dot) onmicrosoft (dot) com

 

Template Version: 2.0

 

This page was last modified on Thursday, March 08, 2012 06:31:03 PM