Skip to main content

Home  ES  JHS  HS  Articles  Blogs  Forum  Links  NonTextbook  Volunteers  Warmups  Shoutbox  SUBMISSIONS   

Go: JHS GrammarPuzzle Scramble

 

SUBMITTED BY: Brenton Gettmann

BORROWED FROM / INSPIRED BY: Puzzles

EDITED BY: まだ

GRAMMAR: Conditional (if)

EXAMPLE: If you can go, please call me.

DATE ADDED: Nov 24, 2010

 

    Small Classes (1-15 Students)ÒLarge Classes (16-39 Students)ÓHuge Classes (40+ Students)ÔBad/Misbehaved ClassesÕHandicapped ClassesÖ

  SpeakingèReadingêListeningë

25-35 min.

9 Votes: 5 Stars

If you're going to give this activity

a low-rating, please post a useful

comment to help make it better.

SearchJHSActivity

BRIEF OUTLINE: This is a very flexible template for you to make sentence scramble lessons with puzzles. It works very well for any class, especially low-level and hard to motivate classes. Students can solve a sentence scramble by solving a puzzle and flipping over the pieces to find a sentence.

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

  • PuzzleScramble attachments: Usually two copies of each puzzle scramble will suffice. The scrambles have been aligned perfectly for you to simply print out the pictures and double side the copies with the correct sentence scramble on the opposite side. Be sure that you print the scrambles out correctly or they will not make sense when flipped over. It is designed so that when the groups are able to make the puzzle, they flip the cards directly over to form the sentence.
  • Envelopes
  • Character cards (To have groups horse race across the blackboard)

 

DETAILED EXPLANATION:

  1. After putting the students in their lunch groups, small groups or pairs, perform a demonstration. The explanation for this activity is super simple for students to understand if you just do one demo example for them.
  2. Have students janken for order, then hand out the worksheet to students at this time as well. NOTE: The following is an optional way for you to get your students even more into the activity. Students can choose a magnetized character card (of your own selection of characters) to represent their team. This character will be moved across the board as a way to keep track of their and the other groups progress and make the game more competitive. (It’s basically a horse race where students move their character card across the board to keep track of how many questions they have answered. Other teams can also see the progress of their competition. Once they move their character to the last spot on the board, they have passed the goal and won the game.)
  3. Give each group an envelope with a picture/sentence scramble in it after the demonstration. Each envelope contains a picture/sentence scramble that the students can choose to unscramble either way they like,but the person, character or noun in the picture must be used to complete the sentence. When the picture is put together correctly, the students flip the cards over to either see the sentence or the person, character, or noun on the cards.
  4. After students have discovered the sentence and the picture, they must all write the correct sentence down on their worksheets, and only after that is the group representative at that time allowed to come to the JTE/ALT and say the sentence by memory.
  5. Students are then given (or can choose the numbered envelope that they need) and move their chosen group character one spot across the board after each correct answer.
  6. Then the next student, for example Student #2, in the group is the representative who will deliver the next sentence by memory to the JTE/ALT after it has been unscrambled correctly and written down by the whole group.
  7. After the game, students will complete the bottom portion of the worksheet. Then, the ALT/JTE will give students the correct sentence combinations to review the 'if' grammar.

 

VARIATIONS:

  • This template is incredibly flexible. I have used it for all grade levels at JHS, and even a few at elementary school. Just plug in a grammar point into the puzzle format. Each puzzle piece doesn't have to be one word, so don't worry about making every sentence nine words.
  • One variation is for grade 1 students, where I have pictures on both sides of the puzzle. One side is a man and the other is a woman. Students then complete the puzzles and write down on a worksheet: "He is (____), and she is (____)."

 

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS:

  • Give students positive reinforcement after they have completed a memorized sentence correctly. If they are having trouble completing the sentence, coach them through it.
  • Even my bad students who hardly ever do anything in English class like to get involved in this lesson. Maybe yours will too.

 

TIPS/CAUTIONS:

  • Put a picture of yourself in as a scramble. It always makes my students laugh when they see a picture of me as one of the puzzles.

If you have an updated attachment, email it to the site: admin (at) epedia (dot) onmicrosoft (dot) com

 

Template Version: 2.0

 

This page was last modified on Monday, March 12, 2012 07:16:47 PM