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Go: JHS GrammarRescue 119

 

SUBMITTED BY: Matt Baumgartner

BORROWED FROM / INSPIRED BY: A TV show and a desperate school situation

EDITED BY: Tatyana Safronova

GRAMMAR: Preposition

EXAMPLE: There is a desk in my room.

DATE ADDED: Nov 05, 2007

 

    Small Classes (1-15 Students)ÒLarge Classes (16-39 Students)Ó

  SpeakingèListeningéReadingêListeningë

35-50 min.

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BRIEF OUTLINE: Students help rescue plane crash victims by locating them in a classroom and then writing a report to submit to the rescue authorities.

 

MATERIALS NEEDED:

  • Rescue119 worksheets: There are two -- Cutouts & Worksheet (before class starts, hide the cutouts in a spare/empty classroom.) Note: Both worksheets are in the same link.
  • A spare or empty classroom.

 

DETAILED EXPLANATION:

  1. First, separate the students into teams. They can be in threes, or more, but four seems to work the best if they are going to be in larger groups. Twos work well only if the students are quick writers.
  2. Give each group a worksheet and then make sure they know the grammar point (prepositions).
  3. Assign one student in each group to be ‘the reporter’, who writes down the information. This job will switch with each ‘rescue-helping' student.
  4. Explain the situation about a plane crashing in the spare (or empty) classroom, and how the students need to locate the victims.
  5. To start, each team sends one ‘rescue-helper’ into the ‘crash scene’ (spare or empty room). Each team’s rescue-helper must locate one (or one set) of survivors.
  6. Each team’s rescue-helper must come back to their team and report on the location of the survivor (or group of survivors). They must use the grammar point: “There is a survivor in the desk!” or “There are some/4/5/2/3 survivors under a chair!”.
  7. While the returning student is explaining where the survivor is, the student in each group who isn’t doing anything should go ahead and become the next ‘rescue-helper’ and leave for the crash scene.
  8. This way, in each team, one student is writing, one is speaking and the other is searching. These roles will change with each turn the students take in locating crash victims.
  9. The team that finds all the survivors first is the winning team.

 

VARIATIONS:

  • Instead of using the characters which come with this game, use action figures (if you have them) such as GI Joe, or Lego People, or whatever ‘little people' you have. You can also use anime characters or famous people, etc. just print out their pics and hide them in the room (crash scene).

 

TEACHING SUGGESTIONS:

  • Explain to the students exactly what they are doing in this game. Explain that plane crashes are real-life events, and that unless people are trained rescue personnel, they can only locate plane crash victims and write a report, not actually touch the victims.
  • The Cutouts worksheet pictures can be made larger by clicking on the picture and dragging it outward to the desired size.

 

TIPS/CAUTIONS:

  • Don’t let the students pick up and bring back the characters with them as they are indeed inclined to do. Also, don’t let them tell each other where they are located in the room, and don’t let the kids move them around the room. If you are assisting in a class or have an extra teacher handy then have them monitor the extra room you are using. And, above all (something YOU, the teacher, need to be careful of) don’t place two characters in similar places unless the difference is one character actually being a ‘set’ of people which need to be found. For example, hide ‘a survivor’ under a desk, and hide ‘some survivors’ under a desk. That’s OK because it makes the kids have to figure out which they are talking about: the survivor under the desk, or the group of survivors under the desk.

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This page was last modified on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 02:37:55 PM